Office of Research News

Moses joins the Office of Research

Tue, 14th March, 2017

Randy Moses

Randy Moses

Randy Moses will be joining the Office of Research as senior associate vice president for research, effective March 15, 2017. In this role, he will assist in providing strategic oversight for the university’s expanding research enterprise. Moses will work to broaden major research initiatives, including playing a role in coordinating Discovery Themes strategies, and strengthen partnerships across the university with college deans, college research officers and other university offices. Moses will also work to enhance the university’s corporate and industrial research portfolio and strengthen defense and security related research. His position represents an expansion of the capability of the Office of Research and will enable growth of the university’s research institutes and core laboratories.

Moses brings to this position considerable experience in strategic organizational leadership, a successful track record in securing funding and a national perspective on key issues related to research. He is currently a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and has served as the associate dean for research in the College of Engineering since 2008. In that role, he led the research endeavors of over 950 faculty and staff, oversaw the college’s research operations totaling more than $128 million in annual research expenditures and grew strategic industry partnerships with companies such as Battelle, Honda and GE Aviation. He also led the IP and commercialization strategy for the college.

Moses received his BS, MS and PhD degrees in electrical engineering from Virginia Tech. He joined Ohio State in 1985.

Category : Office of Research

Oglesbee named interim director of the infectious Diseases Institute

Tue, 7th March, 2017

oglesbeeMichael Oglesbee, professor of veterinary biosciences and faculty lead of the Infectious Diseases Discovery Theme, has been appointed interim director of the newly-established Infectious Diseases Institute. He replaces Larry Schlesinger who was recently named president and CEO of Texas Biomedical Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas. Oglesbee will continue to move forward plans to create a more streamlined and transparent structure for infectious diseases research at the university.

Category : Office of Research

Winslow to lead Center for Lake Erie Area Research

Wed, 8th February, 2017

Christopher Winslow

Christopher Winslow

Christopher Winslow has been appointed director of the Center for Lake Erie Area Research (CLEAR), the multidisciplinary initiative supporting the university’s Ohio Sea Grant College Program. CLEAR is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s nationwide network of 33 Sea Grant programs dedicated to the protection and sustainable use of marine and Great Lakes resources. Winslow will also oversee the operations of F.T. Stone Laboratory, Ohio State’s island campus located on Gibraltar Island.

Winslow brings a wealth of experience and expertise to this position in the areas of strategic planning, Ohio Sea Grant administration, grant management, research, outreach and teaching. He has served as the interim director of CLEAR since April 1, 2015. In this role, he has worked to develop research priorities and facilitated the submission of many interdisciplinary proposals to sponsors. He has also developed strong partnerships with universities, the scientific community, state and federal agencies and local communities, as well as many other key stakeholders. Winslow joined the Ohio Sea Grant Program as an assistant director in December 2011 and moved into the associate director position in June 2014. Prior to joining Ohio State, he spent eight years as a Stone Laboratory faculty member, teaching aquatic ecology classes to high school and college students and mentoring students in the lab’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates program.

Winslow holds a bachelor’s degree from Ohio University and a master’s and PhD in biology from Bowling Green State University.

Category : Office of Research

Yuan Zheng, Lise Worthen-Chaudhari and Jacob Mendlovic named 2016 Innovators of the Year

Wed, 25th January, 2017

As Ohio State continues to expand its role in the commercialization of research, it is important to create an environment that facilitates and rewards research creativity and entrepreneurship. To support and stimulate entrepreneurial activity among Ohio State researchers, three university-wide awards were presented on January 25, 2017, to Ohio State’s most successful entrepreneurs.

Innovator of the Year: Yuan Zheng

Yuan Zheng, Photo by Kevin Fitzsimons

Yuan Zheng
Photo by Kevin Fitzsimons

The 2016 Innovator of the Year is Yuan Zheng, professor of electrical and computer engineering. He has been a leader in robotics research for more than 35 years, creating innovative structures and mechanisms for robotics in industrial, defense and service applications.

In 2014, Zheng developed the Circular Wave Drive (CWD), a compact and co-axial gear head that allows for speed reduction in rotational motions. Speed reducers represent 36% of the total cost of an industrial robot. Yuan’s CWD was developed as a replacement for the traditional Harmonic Drive Gear (HDG) technology used widely in the robotics industry. The HDG technology uses a special metal alloy that has to be replaced every two years and requires expensive high precision machining.

Zheng’s CWD technology overcomes the shortcomings of the HDG. He developed a low-cost, compact, highly-efficient, ruggedized speed reducing gear system. He increased torque capacity and the life span of the gear by eliminating the use of flexible materials in the design. This invention could mean the formation of a new market of ultra-fast, high-precision steering and automation beyond robotic joints.

IKOVE, a local venture capital company, licensed his technology from the university in 2015 and founded a start-up company called CWD LLC. One U.S. patent and one international patent have been filed. Funding from the Ohio Third Frontier’s Technology Validation and Start-up Fund was used to design and fabricate a prototype CWD.

Early Career Innovator of the Year: Lise Worthen-Chaudhari

Lise Worthen-Chaudhari, research asst. prof. in College of Medicine Dance MFA Photo by Jo McCulty

Lise Worthen-Chaudhari
Photo by Jo McCulty

The 2016 Early Career Innovator of the Year is Lise Worthen-Chaudhari, research assistant professor in physical medicine and rehabilitation and associate director of the Human Motion Analysis and Recovery Laboratory. She uses the art, math and science of movement to integrate the creative arts with rehabilitation science.

Worthen-Chaudhari applies new creative paradigms and emerging technologies–from arts, gaming or other disciplines in the creative sector–to improve human recovery and health by making it more engaging and more data-driven. A biomechanist and former professional dancer, Lise combined her passion for biomechanics and dance to develop a revolutionary new therapy that inspires physical rehabilitation via movement that creates art.

She and her team developed an interactive computer program called Embedded Arts for patients receiving occupational, recreational or physical therapy to recover from traumatic brain injuries, strokes and spinal cord injuries. The program uses motion caption technology to highlight the personal nature of prescribed rehabilitative movement and to document the recovery process. Movement detected by lightweight sensors is translated on a computer screen as an abstract painting.

Worthen-Chaudhari’s technology has been licensed to Columbus-based Rekovo–a company whose mission is to “bring innovative ideas to the health care market that are both affordable and create tremendous positive impact.” The ultimate goal is for patients to be able to use this program at home to continue their therapy.

Student Innovator of the Year: Jacob Mendlovic

Jacob Mendlovic, Mechanical Engineering Photo by Kevin Fitzsimons

Jacob Mendlovic
Photo by Kevin Fitzsimons

The 2016 Student Innovator of the Year is Jacob Mendlovic, a recent Ohio State honors graduate with a degree in mechanical engineering and a minor in nuclear engineering. He is passionate about using innovative engineering solutions to solve real-world problems.

Mendlovic is the primary inventor of a patent-pending technology that does electrochemical imaging of below ground biomasses and fuel. He developed a microscale platinum wire probe that uses intrinsic electrochemical properties to create images of subsurface biomass structures.

The probe could provide farmers with information about soil conditions that would help them select crops resistant to drought and make adjustments to planting and irrigation techniques. National Park monitors could use the probe to analyze tree and biomass health, helping to mitigate wild fires. The Office of Energy and Environment sees potential for this technology to identify trace chemicals from fracking applications in water. Jacob worked with Shaurya Prakash, associate professor in mechanical and aerospace engineering, on his research.

Spurred by the success of leading a student group to develop cost-cutting methods for small-scale coffee farmers in Honduras, Mendlovic founded “Students for a Sustainable Honduras.” This club brings together teams of undergraduate students to share ideas and expand the impact of student projects across the country. Following graduation, he aided in the creation of a framework for universal metrics in the energy-water-food-social nexus, allowing for a better understanding of the interactions of these resources with the ever-increasing population.

The Innovator of the Year and Early Career Innovator of the Year awards recognize Ohio State researchers who are working actively to promote commercialization of university intellectual property, through invention disclosures filed, patents applied for and/or received, technologies licensed or spin-off companies formed. These activities support economic development in the Central Ohio region, and serve to attract companies that create a base of operations within the state. The creation of separate categories for more established researchers and for early career researchers allows cultivation of an entrepreneurial spirit among all of our investigators.

The Student Innovator of the Year award recognizes innovation and entrepreneurship among our students that has contributed to the development or commercialization of a new technology.

Category : Office of Research

Mears to lead national security, defense strategy

Wed, 3rd August, 2016

Zachary Mears has joined Ohio State as assistant vice president for national security and research programs, effective August 1, 2016. Zach brings expertise in U.S. national security and defense strategy, planning and resourcing to this new position.

This is a shared leadership position with Battelle and Ohio State’s Office of Research and College of Engineering. Zach will help the university and Battelle develop and implement a strategic relationship management plan related to national security research conducted at Ohio State and Battelle.

Zach will lead the expansion of collaborative research projects, scientific and educational programs and business development opportunities at Ohio State to further the collaborative relationship between the university and Ohio-based federal national security programs. His primary focus will be on the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright Patterson Air Force Base. Zach also will work to develop teams of internal and external partners to identify major state and federal funding opportunities.

Prior to joining Ohio State, Zach served as the deputy chief of staff to the secretary of defense and chief of staff to the deputy secretary of defense in Washington, DC. He advised the secretary and deputy secretary of defense on national priorities and managed their implementation. He also served as the director of the Advanced Capability and Deterrence Panel and led the development of the Third Offset Strategy, which aims to identify new organizational and operational concepts and new capabilities to improve the United States’ military advantage. He also advised the Defense Innovation Unit–Experimental, which is building bridges between the Pentagon and the United States’ technology communities in Silicon Valley and Boston. Prior to these appointments, he served as the director for strategic planning for the National Security Council, where he co-authored the 2015 National Security Strategy. He also worked as a senior defense analyst for Scitor Corporation and as senior consultant for Booz Allen Hamilton.

Zach received his BA in political science from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and his MA and PhD in political science from Ohio State.

Category : Office of Research

Ohio State’s 2015 highly-cited researchers

Tue, 26th January, 2016

Nine Ohio State researchers have made Thomson Reuters’ 2015 list of Highly-Cited Researchers, a measure of the worldwide impact and influence of an individual’s research. These researchers have produced a large number of reports that rank among the top one percent most cited for their subject field and year of publication.

The 2015 researchers and the field(s) for which they were recognized are listed below:

  • William Abraham (Clinical Medicine)
  • Hojjat Adeli (Computer Science as well as Engineering)
  • Clara Bloomfield (Clinical Medicine)
  • Carlo Croce (Clinical Medicine)
  • Hesham El Gamal (Computer Science)
  • Rattan Lal (Agricultural Sciences)
  • Ness Shroff (Computer Science)
  • Rene Stulz (Economics and Business)
  • David Weinberg (Space Science)

Learn more.

Thirteen Ohio State researchers made the 2014 list. They are:

  • William Abraham (Internal Medicine)
  • Hojjat Adeli (Engineering)
  • Hansjuerg Alder (Internal Medicine)
  • Clara Bloomfield (Internal Medicine)
  • Carlo Croce (Biology & Biochemistry and Internal Medicine)
  • Hesham El Gamal (Computer Science)
  • Rattan Lal (Agricultural Sciences)
  • Guido Marcucci (Internal Medicine)
  • Ness Shroff (Computer Science)
  • Rene Stulz (Economics & Business)
  • Martin Tusler (Social Sciences, General)
  • Stefano Volinia (Internal Medicine)
  • David Weinberg (Space Science)

 

Category : Office of Research

Eight Ohio State faculty receive NSF CAREER awards in 2015

Fri, 1st January, 2016

Eight assistant professors received Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) awards in 2015 – the top award given by the National Science Foundation to junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of both.

The 2015 winners are:

Four Ohio State researchers received CAREER awards in 2014. They are:

Category : Office of Research

Ohio State/Brazil collaboration funds 19 grants to develop and strengthen partnerships

Fri, 18th December, 2015

Ohio State University and the São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) continue to build upon existing partnerships and collaborate in new ways, as a result of the Scientific Cooperation Agreement that was signed in March 2013 to support research and innovation. The agreement called for Ohio State and FAPESP to each contribute $700,000 to begin a five-year program.

A joint call for proposals was issued in May 2015 to encourage the formation of research collaborations and encourage the exchange of researchers between FAPESP and Ohio State. Researchers from any department and discipline affiliated with Ohio State and the Higher Education Research Institutions in the State of São Paulo were invited to submit collaborative proposals in two categories:

  • Mobility Grants: Provide up to $20,000 in funding for a period of up to one year for travel, health insurance and living expenses related to the exchange of researchers between the two countries.
  • Regular Research Awards: Provide up to $100,000 in funding for a period of two years for research-related expenses related directly to the project as well as travel, health insurance and living expenses related to the exchange of researchers between the two countries.

Following a competitive review process coordinated by FAPESP and Ohio State, 12 Mobility Grants and 7 Regular Research Grants have been selected for funding. Ohio State and FAPESP will each provide$450,000 for this round of funding.

View the list of funded proposals.

Following the first round of funding in 2013, 24 proposals were selected for funding. View the list of funded proposals from the 2013 call for proposals.

Category : Office of Research

Robert Lee, Melissa Bailey and team of graduate nursing students named 2015 Innovators of the Year

Thu, 22nd October, 2015

As Ohio State continues to expand its role in the commercialization of research, it is important to create an environment that facilitates and rewards research creativity and entrepreneurship. To support and stimulate entrepreneurial activity among Ohio State researchers, three university-wide awards were presented on October 22, 2015, to Ohio State’s most successful entrepreneurs.


Innovator of the Year: Robert LeeRobert-Lee_mailchimpIMG

The 2015 Innovator of the Year is Robert Lee, professor in the Division of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry. His research focuses on the design and development of novel targeted drug delivery systems based on lipid and/or polymer-based nanoparticles.

Dr. Lee has invented a series of novel liposome and lipid nanoparticle formulations during his 18 years at Ohio State. These discoveries have resulted in numerous patent applications, invention disclosures, licensing agreements, sponsored research agreements and business startups – and most importantly, have resulted in new and more effective ways to diagnose and treat prostate, ovarian, colon and lung cancers.

In September 2014, a portfolio of Dr. Lee’s lipid nanoparticle patents, along with miRNA patents of Dr. Carlo Croce in the College of Medicine, was licensed to Microlin Bio Inc. in the university’s largest licensing deal in more than a decade. The portfolio includes nearly 100 issued and pending microRNA patents, as well as a novel nucleic acid delivery technology to deliver these transformational therapies to cancer cells.

Rexahn Pharmaceuticals Inc. licensed Dr. Lee’s proprietary nanoparticle delivery technology that specifically targets tumors with oligonucleotides in a way that increases potency and reduces side effects.

In addition, Dr. Lee has invented a novel liposomal formulation of the anticancer drug bortezomib, which has increased therapeutic activity and reduced toxicity in acute myelogenous leukemia – and he has invented a novel liposomal formulation for therapy of multiple myeloma.

Early Career Innovator of the Year: Melissa BaileyMelissa-Bailey_mailchimpIMG

The 2015 Early Career Innovator of the Year is Melissa Bailey, associate professor in the College of Optometry. Her work in the areas of visual optics and the development of myopia is leading to new technologies that are changing the way health care providers diagnose and treat visual impairment.

In 2014, she won the Big Ideas for Health competition hosted by the IDEA Studio for Healthcare and Design at the Wexner Medical Center for a mobile software application, called TESA (for The Eye Scan App), that allows health care practitioners to make many different measurements of the eye, including an estimate of a patient’s glasses prescription and a new, automated measurement of eye alignment. Current testing for eye misalignment, a condition which causes blurred vision and can’t be corrected after the age of 10, requires high-level technical expertise and specialized equipment. Because of the dramatically simplified hardware and ease of use, Dr. Bailey’s device can be used in any location at a fraction of the cost of existing devices. The invention was licensed in 2014 by the start-up company Sight4All, and may be available to health practitioners within the next year.

Dr. Bailey is also collaborating with emeritus professor of optometry Joseph Barr on the development of a new bifocal contact lens design – the Buck-Eye Contact lens, which received a provisional patent in September. And her non-invasive imaging technique for measuring the size and shape of the eye’s ciliary muscle was issued a patent in June.

Student Innovator of the Year: A Team of Five Graduate Students from the College of NursingStudent_team_mailchimpIMG

The 2015 Student Innovator of the Year award goes to a team of five graduate students from the College of Nursing who developed a mobile app that provides Columbus’ underserved populations with confidential, free, easy access to community resources. The team members are: Sarah-Jane Baserman, Megan Miller-Lloyd, Phillip Newman, Stephanie Ritchie and Hayley Townsend.

What started as a class project to create a resource to tackle a community health problem turned into “MobileYou” – a solution to help low-income and vulnerable populations gain access to food pantries and free meals, free health care clinics and mental health resources, housing and shelters, transportation, employment opportunities, and more.

The team recently submitted an invention disclosure to the Technology Commercialization Office. They plan to make the MobileYou app more robust by adding additional agencies and services, many of whom contacted them after seeing the app featured on a local news broadcast. The team would like to broaden the reach of the app to other cities and states.

 

The Innovator of the Year and Early Career Innovator of the Year awards recognize Ohio State researchers who are working actively to promote commercialization of university intellectual property, through invention disclosures filed, patents applied for and/or received, technologies licensed or spin-off companies formed. These activities support economic development in the Central Ohio region, and serve to attract companies that create a base of operations within the state. The creation of separate categories for more established researchers and for early career researchers allows cultivation of an entrepreneurial spirit among all of our investigators.

The Student Innovator of the Year award recognizes innovation and entrepreneurship among our students that has contributed to the development or commercialization of a new technology. This year’s Student Innovator of the Year award is sponsored by Sigma Xi, the scientific research society honoring excellence in scientific investigation.

Category : Office of Research

Rezai, Sertel and Maung named 2014 Innovators of the Year

Fri, 31st October, 2014

As Ohio State continues to expand its role in the commercialization of research, it is important to create an environment that facilitates and rewards research creativity and entrepreneurship. To support and stimulate entrepreneurial activity among Ohio State researchers, three university-wide awards were presented on October 31, 2014, to Ohio State’s most successful faculty, staff and student entrepreneurs.

Innovator of the Year: Ali Rezai

innovator-of-the-year_trancsendThe 2014 Innovator of the Year is Ali Rezai, MD, Stanley D. and Joan H. Ross Chair in Neuromodulation, director and CEO of the Ohio State Neurological Institute, and director of the Ohio State Center for Neuromodulation. Dr. Rezai is a world-renowned neurosurgeon who is in constant pursuit of new ways to end pain and suffering for patients living with disabilities. He has spent his career developing technologies that regulate specific targets in the central nervous system to treat and alleviate the symptoms of a host of neurological disorders.

Dr. Rezai’s research focuses on neural circuitry, neurological sensors and monitors, and development of surgical tools and new neuromodulation approaches. Working with investigators from the Colleges of Medicine, Engineering and Arts and Sciences, Dr. Rezai initiated the first U.S. trials for deep brain stimulation to treat traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer’s disease, alcoholism and obesity. In collaboration with engineers and scientists from Ohio State and Battelle, Dr. Rezai, along with a team led by Battelle research leader Chad Bouton,  implanted a microchip (Neurobridge) into a patient’s brain that was linked to an external prosthetic sleeve. The procedure allowed the quadriplegic man to move his hand for the first time in four years using his thoughts.

Dr. Rezai holds 35 issued U.S. patents and has more than 50 pending for medical devices and technologies. Three spin-off companies are based on his technology and scientific work – IntElect Medical, Autonomic Technologies and Cardionomics. He was named Cleveland Clinic Innovator of the Year in 2007 and Columbus Business First Innovator of the Year in 2011. He has published more than 150 peer-reviewed articles and 40 book chapters, and serves on the editorial board of five scientific journals.

Dr. Rezai has been the principal investigator and co-investigator on eight National Institutes of Health grants and is the force behind the partnership between the Cleveland Clinic and Ohio State University to fast-track the commercialization of health care technology.

Early Career Innovator of the Year: Kubilay Sertel

Early-Career_Innovator_Sertel_transcendThe 2014 Early Career Innovator of the Year is Kubilay Sertel, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering. His research focuses on Terahertz-frequency sensing, imaging and communications. He developed and commercialized the first real-time, high sensitivity terahertz camera used for medical, communication and security applications.

Dr. Sertel’s video camera “sees” in THz wavelengths. Unlike commercial optical cameras that capture light photons using semiconductor-based sensors, the much longer THz wavelengths use microscopic-scale antennas to capture THz power for detection.

Terahertz offers the capability to not only image through materials, but also to determine their composition. Unlike X-rays, THz waves are safe because of their low-energy, non-ionizing nature. THz waves contain a wealth of information that allow for immediate applications such as security screening through clothing, identification of explosive compounds and life-changing applications such as breast cancer detection.

Dr. Sertel’s camera has been commercialized by Traycer Systems Inc. Traycer has attracted over $7.5 million in venture-backed private equity and $3.5 million in supporting infrastructure.

Dr. Sertel has one issued U.S. patent and two U.S. patents pending, two books and over 250 peer-reviewed journal articles, proceedings and book chapters. He is principal investigator on a $6 million Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) grant from the Office of Naval Research.

Dr. Sertel’s company, TeraProbes Inc., an Ohio State spin-off founded in 2014, recently received $100,000 in funding from the Ohio Third Frontier Technology Validation Start-up Fund to enable commercialization of an efficient method of testing next generation electronic chips.

Student Innovator of the Year: David Maung

Student_innovator_Maung_transcendThe 2014 Student Innovator of the Year is David Maung, a doctoral student in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering. He was the chief architect and software developer for an at-home gaming program for stroke patients who experience motor weakness from hemiparesis – an inability to move one side of the body. Hemiparesis, which can be debilitating, affects 325,000 individuals each year. Yet, less than one percent of those affected receive constraint-induced movement therapy (CI therapy), the most common form of therapy to improve motor function.

Recognizing the need for a low-cost, accessible therapy to improve arm function, David led the software development for “Recovery Rapids,” an innovative 3D computer-gaming version of CI that provides in home, high repetition motor exercise that targets the affected hand, arm and shoulder and encourages use of the weaker arm to perform routine daily activities.

The software was developed in collaboration with a team of clinicians, computer scientists, an electrical engineer and a biochemist from the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, the Wexner Medical Center and Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Next steps will be the formation of a corporation called “Games That Move You” to disseminate this therapy.

The Innovator of the Year and Early Career Innovator of the Year awards recognize Ohio State researchers who are working actively to promote commercialization of university intellectual property, through invention disclosures filed, patents applied for and/or received, technologies licensed or spin-off companies formed. These activities support economic development in the Central Ohio region, and serve to attract companies that create a base of operations within the state. The creation of separate categories for more established researchers and for early career researchers allows cultivation of an entrepreneurial spirit among all of our investigators.

The Student Innovator of the Year award recognizes innovation and entrepreneurship among our students that has contributed to the development or commercialization of a new technology. This year’s Student Innovator of the Year award is sponsored by Sigma Xi, the scientific research society honoring excellence in scientific investigation.

 

Category : Office of Research